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Water Garden

Arrowhead, 'Georgia Peach' Hardy Waterlily, Violet-stemmed Taro

Left to right: Arrowhead (Sagittaria latifolia), ‘Georgia Peach’ hardy waterlily (Nymphaea ‘Georgia Peach’) , Violet stemmed taro (Colocsia violacea)
Floating: Azolla (Azolla caroliniana)

I’d been warned that one of the nuisances of urban beekeeping is when your bees venture into your neighbors’ yards to drink from their dog bowls, pools, and/or birdbaths. Since I wanted to experiment with a water garden anyway, the idea was that this would also be a large, reliable source of water for my bees….Sadly, two months later, they have yet to use it. I have no idea where they are getting water but it’s not from the big, fancy water bowl I built for them. Plenty of other insects are using it, just not my bees.

Luckily, as with any good permaculture design, this wasn’t the only function that the garden was meant to serve. Most of the plants are edible, other neighborhood wildlife does enjoy drinking from it, and it’s attracted a resident dragonfly, an Autumn Meadowhawk (Sympetrum vicinum), who darts around the yard all day long eating mosquitoes and other unpleasants. Plus, it’s another 100 gallons or so of collected rainwater.

Fred, the Autumn Meadowhawk

Fred, the Autumn Meadowhawk

I used a 3-foot round, galvanized livestock tank for the garden. I think stock tank ponds might be a Texas thing, but they are a very popular Texas thing. I came across a really good blog post about building water gardens in stock tanks and, luckily for me, the author lives in Austin so I was able to use the same places for procuring materials, specifically Hill Country Water Gardens & Nursery.

The plants in the garden include: violet stemmed taro (Colocsia violacea), arrowhead (Sagittaria latifolia), ‘Georgia Peach’ hardy waterlily (Nymphaea ‘Georgia Peach’), cabomba (Cabomba caroliniana), and, at the time the top picture was taken, azolla (Azolla caroliniana).

There are also five hardy goldfish in the pond. They eat algae and mosquito larvae, while contributing fertilizer. Turns out they eat azolla too.

I put the rocks in so that birds, squirrels and various sized insects would have access to the water. The plants and rocks are elevated on cinderblocks, which are positioned such that the holes are open, giving the fish places to hide from predators.

There’s chloramine in the City of Austin’s tap water, so I had to initially treat the water with a chloramine remover. Luckily, we’ve been getting enough rain since I installed this that I haven’t needed to add any more water to it yet, but once I do, rather than using city water, I’ll top it off with rainwater from the chickens’ rainwater barrel instead.

Pretty fancy goldfish bowl.

Pretty fancy goldfish bowl.

Discussion (2 Comments)

  1. by Jason Gerhardt
    Reply

    Did the fish eat all of the azolla? This has been something I’m curious about as I pursue a catfish aquaculture?

    Jason

    • Yes, yes they did. Great for them, not great for my azolla supply. If I had realized that ahead of time, I would have doled it out to them much more slowly.

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